Mouthgards found to be effective in prevention tooth and mouth injuries

MouthguardsFoundtobeEffectiveinPreventingTeethandMouthInjuriesAthletes in contact sports are at significant risk for traumatic injury to their teeth and mouth. It’s estimated 600,000 emergency room visits each year involve a sports-related dental injury.

Athletic mouthguards have become the premier safeguard against sports-related oral injuries. First worn by professional boxers in the 1920s, mouthguards are now required for use by various sports associations and leagues — from amateur youth to professional — for a number of sports. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), for example, requires their use during play for hockey, lacrosse, field hockey and football. The American Dental Association recommends mouthguards for 29 sports or exercise activities.

But do mouthguards actually prevent injury? To answer that question in a scientific manner, the Journal of Sports Medicine published an evidence-based report in 2007 on mouthguard effectiveness for preventing or reducing the severity of oral-facial injuries and concussions. While the report objectively analyzed many of the problems and issues associated with mouthguards (like materials, design and durability), it concluded the risk of an oral-facial injury was nearly two times greater without the wearing of a mouthguard.

That being said, most dentists and other professionals in sports safety would advise not all mouthguards are alike. The stock, “off the shelf” mouthguard found in many retail stores with limited size offerings is the least expensive, but also least protective, of mouthguard types. Mouth-formed or “boil-and-bite” protectors, which are softened in boiling water and then bit down on by the player to form the fit, are better than the stock version — however, they often don’t cover all of the player’s back teeth.

The best option is a custom-designed guard made by a dentist for the individual patient. Although relatively expensive (costs range in the hundreds, compared with $25 or less for a stock guard), they provide the highest recognized level of mouth protection.

The bottom line: a mouthguard is a must-wear part of any uniform for any sport that involves contact or high velocity objects of play. If you or a family member is a contact sport athlete, it’s essential you protect your teeth and mouth with a custom-fit, high quality mouthguard.

If you would like more information on mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Athletic Mouthguards.”

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Toothaches – Hartland Dentists Bailey Family Dental

Simple toothaches can often be relieved by rinsing the mouth to clear it of debris and other matter. Sometimes, a toothache can be caused or aggravated by a piece of debris lodged between the tooth and another tooth. Avoid placing an aspirin between your tooth and gum to relieve pain, because the dissolving aspirin can actually harm your gum tissue. Broken, Fractured, or Displaced Tooth A broken, fractured or displaced tooth is usually not a cause for alarm, as long as decisive, quick action is taken.

 Bailey Family Dental Personalized Dental Care From our Family To yours. Providing Complete Dental Care to Families located in Waukesha, Oconomowoc, and Hartland Wi. From the moment you walk in the door, you’ll be welcomed by a caring staff in a relaxed, stress-free environment where the whole family can feel at ease.  At Bailey Family Dental, Drs. Terese and Richard Bailey are committed to your individual attention and strive to provide personalized oral health care tailored to your unique dental needs and goals.  Your health and comfort are our top priorities.  Whether you are looking for information on general dentistry, teeth whitening, crowns, children’s dentistry, preventive care, or periodontal exams, you can learn more about all of your options from our services page.  Feel free to contact our Hartland office with any questions.  We look forward to making each visit to our office a positive experience.

If the tooth has been knocked out, try to place the tooth back in its socket while waiting to see your dentist. First, rinse the mouth of any blood or other debris and place a cold cloth or compress on the check near the injury. This will keep down swelling. If you cannot locate the tooth back in its socket, hold the dislocated tooth by the crown – not the root. Next, place it in a container of warm milk, saline or the victim’s own saliva and keep it in the solution until you arrive at the emergency room or dentist’s office. For a fractured tooth, it is best to rinse with warm water and again, apply a cold pack or compress. Ibuprofen may be used to help keep down swelling. If the tooth fracture is minor, the tooth can be sanded or if necessary, restored by the dentist if the pulp is not severely damaged. If a child’s primary tooth has been loosened by an injury or an emerging permanent tooth, 007c3-buildingtry getting the child to gently bite down on an apple or piece of caramel; in some cases, the tooth will easily separate from the gum. Treatment of an abscessed tooth An abscessed tooth is an infection that has spread bacteria from the root of the tooth to the tissue just below or near the tooth. In general, a tooth that has become abscessed is one whose underlying pulp (the tooth’s soft core) has become infected or swollen. The pulp contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue, and lies within the tooth. It extends from the crown of the tooth, to the tip of the root, in the bone of the jaws. An abscessed tooth can be an extremely painful condition. In some cases, antibiotics are administered in an attempt to kill an infection. Antibiotics and root canal therapy could be used together to restore the tooth to a healthy state.